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GRASS SEEDS

Miller Seeds offers the following certified grass seeds for sale. Please contact us to place your order today.

Native Grasses

  • INDIAN RICE GRASS:
    Native to the high plains of the Rocky Mountain region and very ornamental.

    Growth begins in early spring but stands tend to be short-lived (3 to 4 years). It is a very drought tolerant grass and is often a pioneer species on disturbed sites and sandy soils.

    Indian Rice grass is an excellent forage, both as standing winter hay and for early spring grazing. It can tolerate fire when dormant; it does not tolerate shade.

    Seed of Indian Rice grass is relished by livestock and rodents because it is high in protein and fat. Birds favor the seed because it shatters easily and falls to the ground; with the high fat content, the seeds can sustain life of upland birds during the critical feeding periods of winter.

  • BASIN WILDRYE:
    A tall, coarse plant that provides excellent habitat for wildlife. Provides forage for livestock and wildlife, heavy stems stand up to deep snow pack.

    Basin wild rye is a hardy, robust, long-lived, native, perennial bunch-grass with many basal leaves. Its stems are numerous, erect, stiff and stout, usually 3 to 5 feet tall, but can reach a height of 10 feet on good sites. Leaves are firm, flat, up to 3/4 inch wide and 20 to 30 inches long. Large erect seed heads (spikes) are 4 to 10 inches long. Growing points are 10 to 12 inches above the crown.

    Basin wild rye has good seedling vigor. It is one of the first grasses to initiate spring growth and produces an abundance of basal leaf growth until the development of seed heads in July. After the development of seed heads it makes little more basal leaf growth, and rapidly becomes coarse and stemmy. Basin wild rye has been used for spring calving pastures. The tall growth left standing over winter gives good protection from inclement weather, and the early spring growth provides good quality forage.
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Reclamation Grasses

  • AC SALTLANDER, GREEN WHEATGRASS: NEW
    Livestock forage with exceptional salinity tolerance and potential to displace foxtail barley from a field.

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  • NEWHY RS HYBRID WHEATGRASS:
    A long lived perennial grass that is adapted to semiarid rangeland and demonstrates excellent salinity tolerance. It is most productive on slightly saline or alkaline range sites receiving at least 33 cm of precipitation annually.

    It begins growth early in the spring and its leaves remain green and succulent longer in the growing season than most other wheat grasses.
    Although 'NewHy' begins growth early in the spring, it remains more succulent and palatable for livestock later in the growing season than most other wheat grasses, especially on dry land range sites.

  • SLENDER WHEATGRASS:
    An easily established, short term (5 yrs or less), salinity/drought tolerant grass.

    Slender wheatgrass is a native short-lived perennial bunchgrass. It was widely used for seeding in Western Canada and was known as western ryegrass during the early days of agriculture.

    The grass is a leafy bunch grass with dense fibrous roots to a depth of about 45 cm. The bunches enlarge by tillering to a diameter of about 30 cm. The base of the stems has a reddish or purple color. The grass is adapted to a wide range of soils, but performs better on sandy loams. The grass is less tolerant of drought than crested or western wheatgrass. It requires more than 350 mm of annual precipitation, but is not tolerant of waterlogged soils. The grass is highly productive for the first few years after seeding before decreasing in a stand. It is less competitive with weeds than other wheat grasses, but is tolerant of shade.
    The grass has excellent germination and emergence and is well suited to low areas prone to salinity. Seed stalks are 60-120 cm tall with an abundance of leaves.

    Seed yields are more consistent in regions receiving 350-500 mm of annual precipitation. Under dry conditions, seed head formation may be inadequate to justify harvest of the seed.

  • SANDBURG BLUEGRASS:
    Important forage species used in native mixtures for restoration of rangeland grass and conservation planting.

    Very early spring growth, leafy, erect, long-lived perennial which is drought resistant. This grass is fine stemmed, erect and palatable. Should not be grazed for first 2 years; damaged by overgrazing. Growth starts early in the spring and is ready for grazing a month earlier than crested wheatgrass. Needs 11 to12 inches annual rainfall for maximum forage production.
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Forage Grasses

  • AC SALTLANDER, GREEN WHEATGRASS:
    Livestock forage with exceptional salinity tolerance and potential to displace foxtail barley from a field.

  • CRESTED WHEATGRASS:
    Dry land bunch grass with new varieties having better palatability. Excellent early spring and good fall grazing.

    Crested wheatgrass is commonly recommended for forage production. It is palatable to all classes of livestock and wildlife and is a desirable feed in spring and also in the fall if it re-grows enough. It is commonly utilized for winter forage by cattle and horses, but protein supplements are required to ensure good animal health. It can withstand very heavy grazing pressure (65% use and greater) once stands are established.

    Crested wheat grasses are useful for soil stabilization. They compete well with other aggressive introduced grasses, but because of this trait, they are not compatible in mixes with native species. Their drought tolerance, fibrous root tolerate long periods of inundation, poorly drained soils or excessive irrigation.

    Crested wheat grasses produce leaves in the spring about 10 days after bluegrass species and about 2 to 3 weeks earlier than native wheat grasses.

    Crested wheat grass can be used for hay production and will make nutritious feed, but is more suited to pasture use.

  • INTERMEDIATE WHEATGRASS:
    Good dry land hay, early grazing when more palatable.

    Intermediate wheatgrass is a sod-forming, cool-season, perennial grass. In its native habitat, it grows on high lime soils along hillsides and on plains. It produces good hay and pasture yields.

    Intermediate wheatgrass is more drought-resistant than smooth brome grass and somewhat less hardy and drought-resistant than crested wheatgrass. It has erect stems with a heavy growth of basal leaves. The plants begin growth in early spring and reach a height of 3 to 4 feet by mid-summer. The heads are from 6 to 10 inches long and are typical of the wheat grasses.

    Intermediate wheatgrass has a deep-feeding root system as well as creeping root stalks. Under irrigation, it is an aggressive sod-former. Under dry land conditions, it appears more like a bunchgrass.

    Intermediate wheatgrass grows best on well-drained, fertile soils with ample moisture and tolerates alkalinity. It is suited to a wide range of soil and environmental conditions in its area of adaptation. In general, it does well where brome grass does well. It grows well in irrigated areas, particularly if grown with a legume.

    Intermediate wheatgrass can suffer from winterkilling after dry conditions in the fall. It does not tolerate salinity and wet conditions as well as tall wheatgrass and does not persist in areas with poor drainage.

  • SLENDER WHEATGRASS:
    Easily established, short term (5 yrs or less), Sality/drought tolerant.

    Slender wheatgrass is a native short-lived perennial bunchgrass. It was widely used for seeding in Western Canada and was known as western ryegrass during the early days of agriculture.

    The grass is a leafy bunch grass with dense fibrous roots to a depth of about 45 cm. The bunches enlarge by tillering to a diameter of about 30 cm. The base of the stems has a reddish or purple color. The grass is adapted to a wide range of soils, but performs better on sandy loams. The grass is less tolerant of drought than crested or western wheatgrass. It requires more than 350 mm of annual precipitation, but is not tolerant of waterlogged soils. The grass is highly productive for the first few years after seeding before decreasing in a stand.

    The grass has excellent germination and emergence and is well suited to low areas prone to salinity. Seed stalks are 60-120 cm tall with an abundance of leaves. The seeds are larger than crested wheatgrass.

  • WESTERN WHEATGRASS:
    This is a sod forming wheatgrass used in soil erosion control. In some areas it makes good dry land pasture and hays well.

    Easily established dry land pasture grass with early spring growth and good palatability. Also produces good dry land hay.

    This is a sod forming wheatgrass used in soil erosion control. In some areas it makes good dry land pasture and hays well.

    Western wheatgrass is a perennial and sod-forming grass. Plant growth is vigorous, reaching 2 to 3 feet in height. Leaves are up to 12 inches long, 0.25 inch wide, rather stiff and erect. It thrives best on rather heavy soil, but is adapted to a wide range of soil types, including alkaline soil. This is a very valuable grass, both for feed and for erosion control.

    Western wheatgrass tolerates saline and saline-sodic soils, poor drainage and moderately
    severe drought. It will tolerate spring flooding, high water tables, and considerable silt deposition. It is grazing resistant and can survive fires if in the dormant stage; recovery from fire, however, is slow.

  • PUBESCENT WHEATGRASS:
    An easily established dry land pasture grass with early spring growth and good palatability. Also produces good dry land hay.

    This is a sod-forming grass closely related to Intermediate Wheatgrass and having the same range of adaptation. The heads and seeds of pubescent are covered with short, stiff hairs. In palatability and general appearance pubescent is very similar to intermediate.
    It is more drought tolerant and has more winter hardiness than intermediate wheatgrass. It is useful for hay and pasture. Its outstanding feature is its ability to stay green into the summer months when soil moisture is adequate.

  • MEADOW BROMEGRASS:
    Very good pasture bunchgrass, produces well for hay in alfalfa grass mixtures. Grazed well by livestock with good re-growth.

    Meadow brome grass is best suited for seed production in the Dark Brown, Black, and Gray soil Zones and is adapted to most soil textures. The grass is a long-lived perennial bunch grass which produces an abundance of basal leaves.

    The seed stalks are 60-120 cm high and extend above the mass of leaves in an open panicle. Seedlings are vigorous, but establish slower than smooth brome grass seedlings. Meadow brome grass is winter hardy and moderately tolerant of saline soils, but is less tolerant than smooth brome grass. It tolerates drought well, but is killed if flooded in spring for 10 days or more. The production of seed heads in meadow brome grass drops off sharply after two or three seed crops.

  • SMOOTH BROMEGRASS:
    Sod forming perennial, it is a palatable pasture plant used extensively for an early season pasture.

    Because of its highly developed root system, smooth brome grass is resistant to temperature extremes and drought. It grows best on deep, well-drained silt or clay loam but may also establish itself in sandier soils. The forage quality of smooth brome grass is higher than that of most other cool-season grasses such as orchard grass or tall fescue.

  • RUSSIAN WILD RYE:
    Once established it is very drought tolerant and makes very good year round grazing.

    Russian wild rye is adapted to the brown, dark brown and even black soil zones. It is more easily established and is more productive on loam and clay loam soils. Sandy soils may dry out before the seedling is self sustaining. Russian wild rye is very productive in seep areas and tolerates moderate salinity. Russian wild rye maintains its forage quality even when mature. It makes much better summer and fall pasture than crested wheatgrass. It may be grazed late into the fall and winter and livestock will do well on it.

  • GREEN NEEDLE GRASS:
    Native of the Northern Great Plains. Used in mixtures where establishment of native vegetation is the objective. Well suited for rangeland/hay land uses.

    An erect bunchgrass with a dense root system extending to two to three meters, green needle grass is widely distributed throughout the Prairies although it seldom occurs in dense stands. It most commonly grows on clay soils in association with western wheatgrass, blue grama and needle-and-thread. Germinating seedlings establish rapidly, are disease-resistant and moderately resistant to drought and grasshopper damage. As a result, green needle grass is an important constituent of many planting mixtures. It is highly palatable.
    Good forage for cattle and fair forage for sheep. This grass greens up early in the season and stays green (remains nutritious) late into the summer. It decreases with heavy grazing.

  • BASIN WILDRYE:
    A tall, coarse plant that provides excellent habitat for wildlife. Provides forage for livestock and wildlife, heavy stems stand up to deep snow pack.

    Basin wild rye is a hardy, robust, long-lived, native, perennial bunch-grass with many basal leaves. Its stems are numerous, erect, stiff and stout, usually 3 to 5 feet tall, but can reach a height of 10 feet on good sites. Leaves are firm, flat, up to 3/4 inch wide and 20 to 30 inches long. Large erect seed heads (spikes) are 4 to 10 inches long. Growing points are 10 to 12 inches above the crown.

    Basin wild rye has good seedling vigor. It is one of the first grasses to initiate spring growth and produces an abundance of basal leaf growth until the development of seed heads in July. After the development of seed heads it makes little more basal leaf growth, and rapidly becomes coarse and stemmy. Basin wild rye has been used for spring calving pastures. The tall growth left standing over winter gives good protection from inclement weather, and the early spring growth provides good quality forage.

  • TALL FESCUE:
    Deep rooted cool season perennial grass and it grows well in wet/soggy conditions as well as moderately saline conditions.

    Tall fescue is a deep rooted, cool season perennial grass. The plant produces vigorous growth in the spring and fall and its extensive root system helps it withstand drought conditions. Tall fescue does produce short rhizomes but has a bunch-type growth habit - it spreads primarily by erect tillers. Individual tillers, or stems, terminate in an inflorescence, reach 3 to 4 feet in height, and have broad, dark green basal leaves. Leaf blades are glossy on the underside and serrated on the margins. The leaf sheath is smooth and the ligule is a short membrane. The grass flowers in the spring and seed mature in early summer.
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Turf Grasses

  • KENTUCKY BLUEGRASS:
    A high quality turf grass used in lawn mixtures.

    Kentucky bluegrass spreads by rhizomes. This characteristic of bluegrass helps it fill in
    open areas and produce a denser sod, two characteristics that make it especially desirable as a turf grass.
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Miller Seeds
Box 87 Milk River AB T0K 1M0
PH: (403) 647-2127 Fax: (403) 647-2027
Email: mkmiller@telusplanet.net
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